SESSIONS

SESSIONS 2020-02-20T19:16:06+00:00

The session descriptions are in draft form and are subject to change.

Full Day Professional Institutes

ELD Coordinators Institute

This institute is designed to train new ELD Coordinators to manage the various components of ELD program implementation and administration. During this session, we will take an in-depth look at procedures related to EL identification, placement, assessment, reclassification, monitoring, and reporting. Additional topics covered will include LIEP design and evaluation, ELD curriculum and instructional designs, EL student growth and attainment targets, communicating with parents and families, fostering collaboration, and facilitating an inclusive and supportive school climate for ELs and their families.

Bob Measel, Title III Director and Bilingual Education Advisor, Pennsylvania Department of Education, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, and Andrea Kolb, Statewide Multilingual Education Project Manager, Center for Schools and Communities, Camp Hill, Pennsylvania


ELs in the Social Studies Classroom: Teaching with Primary Sources for All Learners

English learners, students with special needs, honors students, and on-level students are all capable of analyzing primary source documents and using them in research projects. TPS Inquiry Kits help make this possible by providing curated, accessible documents and approachable interactive lessons on research skills.

Lia Atanat, Maryland History Day Outreach and Professional Development Assistant, and Anna Keneda, Maryland History Day Outreach and Professional Development Coordinator, Maryland Humanities, Baltimore, Maryland


Improving Outcomes for Students in Poverty

Approximately one-third of K-12 English learners in the U.S. live in poverty, and migrant families and students are over-represented among our nation’s poor. Young people living in poverty encounter cognitive, academic, and social-emotional challenges that can be mitigated and overcome through evidence-based interventions at the district, school and classroom levels. This session will survey basic concepts about poverty and the effects of poverty as a form of trauma. Participants will consider research-based instructional practices as they connect to culturally-responsive mindsets or stances. Using reflection, talk and writing, participants will investigate equity literacy principles and a pedagogy of equity that frame practices and strategies to improve student outcomes. Participants will identify practices of particular promise within their settings and roles, and will identify specific next steps and outline an action plan to implement selected practices with consistency, uniformity and fidelity.

Albert E. Mussad, Ph.D., Leadership and Instruction Continuous Improvement Specialist, Collaborative for Educational Services, Northampton, Massachusetts

Half Day Professional Institutes

Data Specialist Training

This institute will serve as a training and meeting for the data specialists and backup personnel. It will focus on various issues related to MIS2000, MSIX and other related topics. Attendance is mandatory for data specialists and backup personnel only.

Vaughn Murray, Education Programs Information Technology Manager, Central Susquehanna Intermediate Unit, Milton, Pennsylvania


Early Learning Standards: Linking Standards to Curriculum and Assessment

Quality early learning environments are essential for preparing children to be successful learners as they go through elementary school. One means of attaining high-quality learning environments is to implement curriculum that meets the needs of all children. In this institute, participants will learn about the Pennsylvania Learning Standards for Early Childhood, and they will gain an understanding of how the PA Learning Standards for Early Childhood can support school age curriculum and assessments. Participants will learn how to effectively utilize the Early Learning Standards that incorporate SAS elements and gain greater understanding of how the system offers stronger alignment to the content that children learn as the progress through elementary and secondary school.

Maryann Olley, Early Education Advisor II, Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, Department of Education, Office of Child Development and Early Learning, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania


How Trauma Can Affect Your Window of Tolerance

This institute will provide a basic understanding about Dr. Dan Siegel’s “The Window of Tolerance”. Educators will learn basic techniques for working with children with trauma history and/or dysregulation issues. The Window of Tolerance is the calm and focused state individuals need in order to learn, take in and digest new information, be empathetic, and manage and understand emotions. The concept of “The Window of Tolerance” also works as a helpful tool for educators to implement self-regulation and mindfulness practices with students so they may be able to eventually broaden their window of tolerance, increasing the capacity to learn and grow. This institute will also bolster educator’s ability to manage their own stress levels when working closely with children impacted by trauma through mindfulness, cognitive reframing, and self-care strategies.

Kate Zelazny, MSW, LSW, Family Based Mental Health Therapist, Milton, Pennsylvania


Interpretation and Translation Services for Families: Ensuring Equity through Language Access

Federal law requires that parents and families receive information from their children’s school in a language they understand, which involves providing interpretation and translation services.
This session will focus on language access and its role in equity for students and families. Participants will acquire information on language access laws and requirements for interpretation and translation services for parents in schools; increase knowledge of the role language access plays in equity; gain awareness of the various access points for families in communicating with their child’s school; and discover strategies for providing language access in specific settings such as parent-teacher conferences, parent workshops, and Back to School Night.

Laura Gardner, Founder and Lead Consultant, Immigrant Connections, Washington, D.C.


Promote Inclusion, Ensure Equity and Create Opportunities for Culturally Diverse Families

Equity and inclusive education addresses the need for authentic engagement of racially and culturally diverse students, and their families while ensuring more equitable access and opportunity for all students and families across urban, rural, and suburban settings. This institute will share work from Washoe County School District, this and will provide an understanding of how to create an equitable educational culture through culturally responsive practices while incorporating high expectations, relevancy, rigor, and relationships in every student’s education. Additionally, this institute will examine how diverse populations are affected by implicit bias, disproportionality, privilege and entitlement, and other systemic barriers and how we can resolve and avert future barriers.

Tiffany Young, Director of Equity and Diversity, Tiffany Young Consulting LLC, Sparks, Nevada


Time Management: I NEED MORE TIME!

Everyone feels like there is never enough time in the day. This institute will allow participants to learn how to organize their priorities and manage their time. Learn to identify time wasters and gain creative solutions to increase your productivity and efficiency. This institute will also help you identify some organizational habits to allow more workable time in a day.

Mandy Schwemm, Talent Development Section Manager/HR Analyst, Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, Office of Administration, Employment, Banking and Revenue Human Resources Delivery Center, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania

Concurrent Sessions

Classrooms where Migrant Students and ELs Belong; Learning from the Research, Learning from Each Other

Given the potential diversity of English learners (ELs) in terms of language, citizenship, ethnicity, religion, socioeconomic status and race, language teachers are often uniquely positioned to support students and foster a sense of belonging in their language learning classrooms. Participants in this session will review the current research regarding belonging in language classrooms and then engage in a gallery walk to learn from other teachers about how to identify practices and dispositions that are characteristic of classrooms that foster self-acceptance and belonging, rather than merely a feeling of “fitting in.” The workshop will conclude with opportunities for participant reflection and action planning.

Tina Keller, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of TESOL, and Marissa Donlevie, Undergraduate Student in the School of Business, Education, and Social Sciences (Spanish Major), Messiah College, Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania


Connecting Migrant Students in Need of Academic Support with Pre-Service Teachers: Best Practices from A University Collaboration with the Migrant Education Program to Foster PreK-4 Growth

This session will present best practices learned from a program in which pre-service teachers tutored children enrolled in the Pennsylvania Migrant Education Program in an after-school setting using best practices for intervention with English learners (ELs) as part of a course studying non-discriminatory evaluation (mandated through IDEA). Pre-service teachers assessed children, taught critical content to remediate deficits, and monitored progress. Substantial gains for children were reported. During this interactive session, assessment methods and instructional decisions based on outcomes will be explored along with teaching materials appropriate for ELs.

Jayne Leh, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Special Education, Guadalupe Kasper, Instructor of Curriculum and Instruction, and Brett Spencer, Reference and Instructional Librarian, Penn State University Berks, Reading, Pennsylvania, and Lees Chevere, Team Leader, Migrant Education Program, Reading Pennsylvania


Cultural Competency: View of Programs, Policies, Practices, and Decisions

In this session, participants will learn how to utilize the Cultural Proficiency Continuum to assess their own level of cultural awareness. The Continuum was adapted from Lindsey, Robins, and Terrell’s Cultural Proficiency, A Manual for School Leaders (2009). Participants will examine the guiding principles and essential elements of cultural competency to build self-awareness and understand how to address systemic change within their organizations.

Tiffany Young, Director of Equity and Diversity, Tiffany Young Consulting LLC, Sparks, Nevada


Equipping Teachers to See and Serve Newcomers

As English learners (ELs) are increasingly pushed into mainstream classrooms, there is a need to equip all classroom teachers with skills and strategies for meeting the needs of ELs. The resulting training programs and books often equip teachers well for meeting the needs of ELs with some English proficiency. However, overly broad discussions of strategies and differentiation may leave one particular group of ELs poorly served: newcomers. Teachers often have not developed the skills to address the needs of ELs entering our schools with little or no English proficiency. Participants will engage in experiential learning, discussion, and application for working with newcomers.

Kathleen Gill, Director of ESOL and World Languages, Newcomer Academy Principal, Allentown School District, Allentown, Pennsylvania


Findings from a Family-Style English Language Clinic

In this workshop, presenters and participants will discuss data collected from the first year of the English Language Clinic that focuses on intergenerational literacy, serving both children and adults in Erie, Pennsylvania. The family-style language clinic is run through a charter school, and addresses both school readiness and English proficiency using various instructional strategies including small-group discussion, direct instruction, and a cooperative learning curriculum.

Heather-Lee Baron, Ph.D., Professor of Middle and Secondary Education and Educational Leadership, Edinboro University of Pennsylvania, Edinboro, Pennsylvania, Erica Andryc, Language Arts Teacher, Charter School of Excellence, Erie, Pennsylvania, and Robin Marshall, Middle School Science Teacher, Erie School District, Erie, Pennsylvania


Interpretation and Translation Services for Families: Ensuring Equity through Language Access

Federal law requires that parents and families receive information from their children’s school in a language they understand, which involves providing interpretation and translation services. This session will focus on language access and its role in equity for students and families. Participants will acquire information on language access laws and requirements for interpretation and translation services for parents in schools; increase knowledge of the role language access plays in equity; gain awareness of the various access points for families in communicating with their child’s school; and discover strategies for providing language access in specific settings such as parent-teacher conferences, parent workshops, and Back to School Night.

Laura Gardner, Founder and Lead Consultant, Immigrant Connections, Washington, D.C.


Techniques and Tips for Tablet MIS2000

Do you use a tablet or laptop for your work with the Migrant Education Program? This workshop will go over some Tablet MIS2000 basics, proper upload procedures, data requirements, basic reporting, and a few tips to make MIS2000 work better for you. This will include hands-on practice time.

This session is mandatory for any MEP staff that have been with the program less than one year or have been recommended for this session by a project manager. Attendees should bring a tablet/laptop to the workshop session in order to participate in hands-on exercises.

Elizabeth Weaver-Ronk, Senior Systems and Data Analyst Coordinator, Vaughn Murray, Education Programs Information Technology Manager, and Thomas Naugle, Senior Technology Consultant, Central Susquehanna Intermediate Unit, Milton, Pennsylvania


TransACT Parent Notices: Available Resources and Updated User Interface

The Pennsylvania Department of Education in partnership with the Central Susquehanna Intermediate Unit and Center for Schools and Communities provides K-12 educators with access to the TransACT’s General Education Parent Notices and ESEA (ESSA) Parent Notices (more than 200 forms and letters, in 20 or more languages). Come and learn about the notifications and other resources available to use with parents and families and preview the updated user interface.

David Holbrook, Ph.D., Executive Director, Federal Programs and State Relationships, and Jamie Osgoodby, Senior Account Manager and Customer Care Representative, TransACT Communications, Lynnwood, Washington


Working Memory: The Key to Maximizing Student Learning

Every student has a tremendous capacity to remember what they are taught. However, even with 100 billion neurons (give or take a few billion!), they sometimes are not successful in storing information in long-term memory for future retrieval and use. But, there are many strategies that maximize use of working memory to enhance storage and permanent learning. Participants in this session will be introduced to some of these strategies and explore ways to incorporate them into the classroom.

Cora Dzubak, Ph.D., Instructor and Academic Adviser, Millersville University of Pennsylvania, Millersville, Pennsylvania

Round-Table Discussions

Beyond Grade 12 – Helping Migrant Students and English Learners Prepare for the Future

The term “college readiness” is heard more and more in our schools, but preparing English learners and migrant students for college is a challenge. Join us for an engaging roundtable discussion about how to integrate advising strategies and career exploration to support students’ success. Participants will leave with techniques, strategies, and ideas to improve the efficiency of their programs.

Jenny Hernandez, College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) Director, Millersville University, Millersville, Pennsylvania


Beyond the Consumption of Suffering and the Pedagogy of Pity

The pedagogy of pity is more successful at sending minority students to corrections than to college. In this roundtable discussion, participants will analyze the unspoken and implicit ways in which certain forms of “celebrating diversity” mask a hidden celebration of suffering that perpetuates systems of inequity and oppression.

Andrea Kolb, Statewide Multilingual Education and Instructional Design Project Manager, Center for Schools and Communities, Camp Hill, Pennsylvania, and Paulette Bartolacci, ESOL Teacher, Bethlehem Area School District, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania


Coordinating Academic Support Services for Migrant and English Learner Students

What can educators do in the classroom to meet the needs of their migrant students, especially those who are English learners? Teachers need a solid understanding of the cultural and social dimensions of the lives of MEP students as well as access to resources, translators, and, above all, support in learning how to provide the children of migrant workers with their best chance for academic success. In this session, participants will learn about the support services that are provided via the PA-MEP. Participants will gain a better understanding of the challenges that migrant students face and identify effective strategies that will improve the coordination and delivery of services. Workshop participants will leave this session with resources featuring essential background information, classroom strategies, recommended books, and a list of migrant education related programs.

Lees Chevere, Team Leader, Migrant Education Program, Reading, Pennsylvania, and Jose Reyes-Lua, Statewide Migrant Education Recruitment Coordinator, and Inés Vega, Statewide Migrant Education Parent Involvement Coordinator, Center for Schools and Communities, Camp Hill, Pennsylvania


Evaluating Best Practices for Non-Instructional Professional Development

A newcomer student’s school experience is significantly impacted by the degree to which interactions with school staff are positive and helpful. To support staff in learning how to navigate these interactions with multilingual students and families, the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society of Pennsylvania has designed and piloted professional development sessions for schools in Philadelphia. Roundtable participants will analyze this training model, compare professional experiences and offer suggestions for potential modifications and new considerations.

Valeri Harteg, Education Program Manager, and Michelle Ferguson, Immigrant Education Specialist, Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania


Home Visit Safety

Personal safety is paramount for migrant educators when working in the field conducting in-home visits with students and their families. This roundtable discussion will review personal safety techniques and role-play safety scenarios for in-home service providers, specifically Migrant Education Student Support Specialists and Recruiters. Participants will discuss general safety tips as well as specific safety strategies for before, during, and after your in-home visit.

Randall B. Fox, Director, Center for Safe Schools, Camp Hill, Pennsylvania


Individual Language Plans for Multilingual Learners

Individual Language Plans (ILPs) provide teachers and staff with valuable information regarding a multilingual learner’s ACCESS testing information, targeted instructional strategies, goals for future growth, and background information. Sharing ILPs with staff provides them with a blueprint they can use to create instructional goals geared toward improving English proficiency in the domains of reading, writing, speaking and listening.

Mandy Haugh, ESL Program Specialist K-3, Conewago Valley School District, New Oxford, Pennsylvania


Learning Within the Revolving Door: Supporting English Learners Who Experience Transiency

Many English learners, particularly those deemed long-term ELs, experience inconsistent language instruction educational programs. In many cases, inconsistency is the result of transiency as students and their families move between states, school districts, school buildings, or even programs within individual schools. In this roundtable, educators will explore ways to best support students who arrive after the start of the school year, often without academic records, or leave in the middle of a year.

Donna Sharer, Ed.D., Curriculum Development Specialist, School District of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania


Mindfulness Minutes: Simple Ways to Implement Mindfulness as a Daily Practice

In today’s rush, we all think too much, seek too much, want too much, and forget the joy of just “being.” Mindfulness activities can reduce bullying, increase focus, and improve well-being and social skills. During this roundtable, we will discuss mindfulness activities that can be shared with families and students.

Marta Droddy, Education Consultant, Hanover, Pennsylvania, and Donna Quatman-Wilder, Family and Community Involvement Teacher Specialist, Frederick County Public Schools, Frederick, Maryland


Moving from Traditional to Discourse-Based Grammar Instruction: A Teacher Action Research Study

In this roundtable discussion, the presenter will share preliminary results from a teacher action research study focused on the impact of discourse-based grammar instruction on middle school English learners. Research supports discourse-based language teaching over traditional forms of skill and drill grammar instruction. Preliminary findings reveal an increase in students’ oral and written English production as well as greater engagement in language instruction when instructed using discourse-based pedagogies.

Sara Stringfellow, Middle School English Teacher, ESL Program Specialist Candidate (Penn State Harrisburg), Harrisburg City School District, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania


Pennsylvania Department of Education English Learner Program Policies and Regulations Q&A

In this informal discussion, Pennsylvania Department of Education (PDE) staff will share a few English Learner Program Area updates. Then, educators and administrators will have the opportunity to ask EL policy-related questions and engage in open discussion with PDE staff.

Bob Measel, Title III Director and Bilingual Education Advisor, and Julia Hutton, Bilingual Education Advisor, Pennsylvania Department of Education, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania


Resilient and Purposeful Educators Create Healthy Learning Environments

Resiliency and knowledge of social emotional behavioral interventions is fundamental in schools today. Teachers and students alike can thrive consistently when school experiences cater to the mental and emotional spheres of each student. Our roundtable discussion will share what has worked for us as educators as we continually thrive to become resilient and implement strategies that meet the needs of our student body.

Diana Rivera Moraes, ELD Teacher, Lebanon High School, Lebanon, Pennsylvania, and Wanda Sunkel, ELD Teacher/ MS Coordinator, and Priscila Sable, ELD Teacher, Lebanon Middle School, Lebanon, Pennsylvania


Seeing the Connection Between Visibility of English Learners and Equity in Schools

Making sure English learners (ELs) are visible members of the school community is a critical part of educational equity. How do you ensure ELs are equitably represented in the school community? In this roundtable discussion, participants will explore the process of creating an environment for ELs in which they are active members in all aspects of school programming. When ELs are seen and heard in the various aspects of the school experience, they are better positioned to meaningfully contribute to and benefit from school learning.

Cindy Barnes, ELD Specialist, Springfield School District, Springfield, Pennsylvania


The State of Teen Pregnancy in Pennsylvania and Meeting the Needs of Pregnant and Parenting Students

Participants in this roundtable session will take part in a candid discussion about the state of teen pregnancy in Pennsylvania, including data and statistics, pregnancy prevention education, and the challenge of meeting the needs of pregnant and parenting teens. Facilitators will provide resources and information about Education Leading to Employment and Career Training (ELECT), the Pennsylvania Department of Education initiative funded by the Department of Human Services, that enables school districts and intermediate units to help eligible pregnant and parenting teens earn a diploma or high school equivalency (HSE) certificate, develop life and parenting skills, and make the transition to employment, career training or higher education.

Lisa Lockwood, ELECT Program Officer, Pennsylvania Department of Education, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, and Nichole Fisher, ELECT Program Coordinator, Center for Schools and Communities, Camp Hill, Pennsylvania


Strengthening Connections Between Migrant Education Program and Schools

The goal of the Migrant Education Program is to ensure that all migrant students reach challenging academic standards and graduate with a high school diploma (or complete a GED) that prepares them for responsible citizenship, further learning, and productive employment. Forging a strong partnership between the Migrant Education Program and schools creates a stronger ecological system of support for migrant students and their families. In this roundtable discussion, MEP staff and school personnel are invited to share ideas about how to build strong collaborative partnerships, leverage collective assets, and create holistic support systems for migrant students that bridge home, community, and school.

Dámaso Albino, Jr., Director of Migrant Education Program, Millersville University, Millersville, Pennsylvania


Supporting Newcomer English Learners through ECOS Team Meetings

This roundtable discussion will explore an approach to effectively support newcomer English learners as they transition to a new school setting. Through the use of Ensuring a Continuum of Services (ECOS) teams, schools can proactively develop strategies for effectively welcoming and instructing newcomer English learners. Teachers and other stakeholders will be led through a protocol to collaboratively address how to best provide scaffolds and other accommodations to promote success throughout multiple contexts within the school setting and how to revisit and adjust these strategies as needed to promote a layer of continued support.

Katelyn Barlet, D.Ed., Supervisor of English Language Development, World Languages, and Spanish Immersion, and Jennifer Kaufmann, ELD Consultant, Manheim Township School District, Lancaster, Pennsylvania


You Read! I Read! We Read! – ¡Tú Lees! ¡Yo Leo! ¡Nosotros Leemos! An Asset-Based, Language-Focused Family Engagement Program

You Read! I Read! We Read! – ¡Tú Lees! ¡Yo Leo! ¡Nosotros Leemos! is an asset-based, language-focused, family engagement program implemented at Hazleton Elementary Middle School. The program was designed to celebrate bilingual children’s literature and bridge English learner (EL) students’ primary languages and English while strengthening the parent and child bond, connecting parents with their child’s educational experience, validating the cultural and linguistic assets of ELs and their families, and promoting a school climate of diversity and respect.

Carinne Karlick, ELD Specialist, and Meredith O’Donnell, ELD Specialist, Hazleton Area School District, Hazleton Elementary Middle School, Hazleton, Pennsylvania

Concurrent Sessions

Adverse Childhood Experiences and Childhood Development

Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) occur in childhood and have a lasting effect on child development. Nearly 45% of children in Pennsylvania have experienced one or more ACEs, and children identified as migrant, homeless, or English learners are reported to have a higher number of ACEs due to family separation, difficulties securing social support, and transiency. This presentation will provide an overview of definitions associated with trauma; review data, signs, and symptoms of trauma; present risk and protective factors for students; as well as provide resources that can be immediately used by teachers and staff in the field to foster systems of support and facilitate student resilience.

Dana Milakovic, Psy.D., Mental Health/AOD Specialist, Pennsylvania Department of Education Office of Safe Schools, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania


Digital Tools and High Impact Teaching Strategies in the Classroom

Workshop participants will be introduced to the topic of high-impact teaching strategies and how to blend digital tools into teaching activities to engage their English learners. In this session teachers will be given the opportunity to join a Google Classroom, participate in interactive presentations using Nearpod or Peardeck, post a summarizing video in Flipgrid, show their understanding of the topics discussed in a Kahoot, and leave the presenters feedback in a Google Form exit ticket.

Jenny Shickley, ELD Instructor, and Nadja Liptak, ELD Instructor, Central Dauphin School District, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania


Facilitating Positive Acculturative Outcomes through Mentoring

During this interactive workshop, participants will work to create a school- or district-wide plan that addresses the acculturation process for all students. Using a current mentoring program initiative led by the presenters as a guide, participants will identify areas of focus for their own school programming. A needs assessment and comprehensive plan for a mentoring program will be discussed and created.

Cindy Barnes, ELD Specialist, and Lisa Gowman, ELD Specialist, Springfield School District, Springfield, Pennsylvania


Facilitating Special Education and ESL/Bilingual Educators’ Collaboration with Questions

Often teachers from special education classrooms and ESL or bilingual education classrooms do not regularly collaborate, not because they do not know it is important, but because they do not know where to begin or have time. In this session, we share how questions can be used to facilitate dialogue. Participants will be introduced to guiding questions that can be used to foster collaboration between special education and bilingual/ESL teachers.

Christine Montecillo Leider, Ph.D., Clinical Assistant Professor and Program Director for Bilingual Education and TESOL Education, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts, and Sara Niño, Ph.D., Lecturer, Assessment of Bilingual Learners with Disabilities, Lasell University, Newton, Massachusetts


From the Border to the Classroom

A rising number of children continue to cross the border and are detained in horrific conditions. This presentation will provide background on what is happening on the border through firsthand accounts from an attorney who has interviewed hundreds of detained children and parents. Participants will learn about legal protections; gain awareness about the experiences of detained children; and learn strategies to ensure they are properly supported in school.

Natasha Quiroga, J.D., PREP Director and Senior Counsel, Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law, Washington, D.C.


Keeping Safe on the Road and On-Site: Practical Steps to Enhance Your Safety

This workshop will include practical steps to enhance safety for recruiters of the Migrant Education Program. The workshop discussions will also include steps that recruiters can take to protect their safety while on-site conducting an MEP visit.

Kelly Smith, Trooper/Community Service Officer, Pennsylvania State Police, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania


OnTrack to Post-Secondary Education

OnTrack to Post-Secondary Education is a college and career readiness eLearning curriculum and delivery platform designed to help 9th to 12th grade students successfully navigate high school, understand the process and requirements to obtain some type of post-secondary education and learn how to access and receive financial aid. OnTrack is delivered through grade-specific short videos, covering topics such as: Developing Strong Study Skills, ACT/SAT Prep, Resolving Conflict, FAFSA completion and Paying for College. OnTrack is provided at no cost to students, parents and staff.

Michael Hackman, Managing Director, Education Mentoring Programs, Uncommon Individual Foundation, Devon, Pennsylvania


Promising Practices for Supporting Dual Language Learners

This session will provide participants with knowledge about dual language development while also introducing WIDA’s Can Do Descriptors, Early English Language Development Standards, and WIDA Early Years Promising Practices. Participants will explore these dual language learners (DLLs) supports provided through WIDA and have a chance to use them to intentionally plan for language instruction. This session will provide examples of how DLLs with multiple home languages can be supported in the classroom through intentional planning.

Barry Wiestling, Early Childhood Education Advisor, Pennsylvania Department of Education, Office of Child Development and Early Learning, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania


Using Kid Writing to Engage ELs in Reading, Writing, Speaking, and Listening in the Regular Education Classroom

This presentation will provide primary teachers with the tools and strategies needed to support English learners (ELs) in early childhood classrooms using developmental writing to develop reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. Methods are drawn from the Kid Writing model, and are based on the text “Kid Writing: A Systematic Approach to Phonics, Journals, and Writing Workshop,” by Eileen Feldgus, and Isabell Cardonick. The session will highlight specific aspects of this developmental writing approach that support language development for ELs.

Susan Vaites, Ed.D., Director of Curriculum and Professional Development, Hatboro-Horsham School District, Horsham, Pennsylvania

Concurrent Sessions

Building Strong School Partnerships with Multilingual Families that are Culturally Sustaining and Responsive

Established practices for parent engagement may not effectively support culturally and linguistically diverse families because they do not account for cultural variation in parental and family involvement with school-based activities, particularly among multilingual families. This session will explore approaches to communicating with families of English learners (ELs) that are effective in creating a school climate of inclusion and equity. The presentation is a case study of how one charter school in Philadelphia with a large population of ELs supports and engages multilingual families through culturally responsive communication practices.

Veronica Williams, Ed.D., Assistant Director of Specialized Services, Mastery Charter Schools, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and Vera Lee, Ed.D., Associate Clinical Professor of Education, Kristine Lewis Grant, Ph.D., Clinical Professor of Education, Barbara Hoekje, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Education, and Janel Dia, Ph.D. Student of School of Education, Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania


English Learner Accountability: Growth-to-Target and the Future Ready PA Index

Participants will be able to access the Future Ready PA Index; understand how the EL indicator in the FRI is calculated; understand what the EL indicator means for their school; understand how the EL indicator fits in to the overall state accountability system under the state’s approved consolidated ESSA plan.

Bob Measel, Title III Director and Bilingual Education Advisor, Pennsylvania Department of Education, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania


High Impact Teaching Strategies for Student Motivation: Making a Positive Impact on ELs and Migrant Students

Many English Language Development (ELD) students feel displaced in America. They are often left on the fringes physically, emotionally, intellectually and mentally. Educators are responsible for intentionally designing classrooms and enacting practices that facilitate feelings of belonging. Through the High Impact Teaching Strategy of Student Motivation, educators in this session will learn how to engage ELD students and make them feel at home, even if they feel far from their physical one. We will discuss strategies to interact with ELD students and encourage them to think, smile, dream, and strive to achieve their maximum potential.

Christopher Kasian, ELD Teacher, Central Dauphin School District, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania


Science and ELs: Creating a Natural Connection

This interactive workshop will demonstrate the ways in which two English language development (ELD) specialists and a secondary biology teacher collaborated to combine ELD strategies with biology concepts to enhance the learning for all students. Participants will gain new hands-on activities to try in any content area classroom. Teachers will be actively involved in learning the innovative strategies involving technology and paper-based methods.

Kristi McConnell, ELD Coordinator, Dauphin County Technical School, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, Emily Wolszczenski, ELD Specialist, Capital Area Intermediate Unit, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, and Meri Beth Furlong, Biology Teacher and ELD Specialist, Dauphin County Technical School, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania


Strategies for Working with Out of School Youth

Working with out-of-school youth (OSY) can be challenging and intimidating. This workshop will address strategies to overcome possible barriers and challenges that staff may encounter when working with OSY. Participants will receive information about what to do once an OSY is recruited, including available resources, tips, and methods for program retention. Safety considerations and relationship building techniques will also be shared.

Emily Williams, Migrant Education Program State Identification and Recruitment Coordinator, South Carolina Department of Education, Columbia, South Carolina


Teaching for Social Justice: Secondary Newcomers Discovering 1930s U.S. Immigration and Migration through Primary Source Analysis

Using the Quality Teaching for English Learners unit plan framework, Universal Design, and Teaching Tolerance’s Social Justice Standards, participants will explore a unit for secondary entering and emerging English learners that engages them in primary source analysis. The unit on migration and immigration in the United States in the 1930s incorporates the four social justice standards and engages students in analyzing primary sources from the Library of Congress digital collections.

Donna Sharer, Ed.D., Curriculum Development Specialist, School District of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania


Using Multicultural Children’s Literature to Promote Belonging

Publishing trends for children’s books often fail to reflect children’s lived experiences. Many children express frustration when they cannot find books with characters that share similar identities and backgrounds. Scholar and educator of Latinx children’s literature, Professor Rhodes will discuss the importance of building a diverse classroom library. Rhodes will build on Rudine Sims Bishop’s groundbreaking 1990 study “Mirrors, Windows, and Sliding Glass Doors” and provide examples of children’s books that mirror students’ realities. Workshop participants will also learn classroom strategies and discuss culturally complex lesson plans to help introduce diverse children’s literature to all students.

Cristina Rhodes, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of English, Shippensburg University, Shippensburg, Pennsylvania


What Everyone Needs to Know About Keeping Data Safe and Secure

Everyone has heard about data fraud and security breaches. However, as an employee of an educational entity, do you know what your responsibilities are to prevent security breaches? This session will present various data breach scenarios and overview best practices so that you do not become a victim.

Vaughn Murray, Education Programs Information Technology Manager, Central Susquehanna Intermediate Unit, Milton, Pennsylvania

Concurrent Sessions

Access and Equity: Instructional Strategies for Teaching Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Students

Educators must develop an understanding of effective strategies for teaching culturally and linguistically diverse students. In order to support and improve the instructional practices of teachers, research indicates that district administrators must develop appropriate professional development plans with a focus on job-embedded, ongoing, and relevant opportunities to grow as teachers. The purpose of this workshop is to help participants learn how to create and facilitate staff professional development with an emphasis on effective instructional practices.

Susan Silver, Ed.D., Assistant Superintendent, and Angela Della Valle, K-12 ESL Department Head, Upper Merion Area School District, King of Prussia, Pennsylvania


Breaking the Iron Cage of Poverty

Most information on poverty comes from the media, which predominately provides stories that perpetuate myths and stereotypes. In this interactive session, Dr. Beegle will provide educators with a poverty knowledge base necessary for improving educational success. Participants will gain tools for understanding how the many different life experiences of poverty impact educational success and what they can do to improve outcomes. Dr. Beegle will also share examples of schools that are implementing her strategies and are demonstrating success in removing poverty-related obstacles.

Donna Beegle, Ed.D., President, Communication Across Barriers, Tigard, Oregon


Bridges to EL Equity through Formative Language Assessment

In this session, participants will explore three types of assessment – assessment as learning, for learning, and of learning (Gottlieb, 2016) – as well as the ways in which educators can leverage the data from each type to develop more equitable instruction and assessment practices for English learners. Participants will practice creating standards-based success criteria, brainstorm strategies for co-constructing assessment practices with students, and prepare to collaborate with other educators to make more meaningful use of assessment data over time. In this session, we will explore formative assessment not as documents or tools but as practices to be enacted.

Andrea Kolb, Statewide Multilingual Education and Instructional Design Project Manager, Center for Schools and Communities, Camp Hill, Pennsylvania, and Christina Khoury, 3rd grade teacher, Spring-Ford Area School District, Royersford, Pennsylvania


College and Career Readiness and Pathways: Building Capacity for ELs and Migrant Students

There is a growing need for states to strengthen efforts to ensure that English learners and migrant students are both prepared for college and career success and have the requisite knowledge to navigate college and career pathways. This session will explore what practices and policies need to be enacted to increase the capacity for these students to succeed. Participants will have the opportunity to hear successful testimonies from EL students.

Jenny Hernandez, College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) Director, Millersville University, Millersville, Pennsylvania


Home Visiting Resources for Early Childhood

The role of the home visitor/parent educator is to work with family members to support parents as their child’s primary teacher. In home visitation, a positive relationship is built through an understanding of family systems, family rules and influences, and family culture. This relationship is strengthened through the effective use of the roles of partnering, facilitating and reflecting. Participants will learn about the importance of developing an intentional plan for each visit (that includes parent input) to ensure that families make progress towards their goals. Workshop participants will have an opportunity to explore lessons learned from evidence-based and school-based home visiting programs that can be applied when working with families.

Katherine Noss, Family Support Technical Assistance Coordinator, Center for Schools and Communities, Camp Hill, Pennsylvania


Learning About Other Cultures through Games

Games are a huge part of most cultures throughout the world. What better way to learn about other cultures than by finding out the origins of the games they play. In this session, you will not only learn the background of the games, you will get a chance to experience playing the games. While learning about cultural games, you will also broaden necessary intellectual, health and wellness skills.

Marta Droddy, Family, Community and Business Engagement Liaison, Carroll County Public Schools, Westminster, Maryland, and Donna Quatman-Wilder, Family and Community Involvement Teacher Specialist, Frederick County Public Schools, Frederick, Maryland


Supporting Classroom Teachers in Providing ELs Equitable Access to Content Curricula

During this session, participants will discuss supports for content area teachers in order to ensure English learners (ELs) have access to grade level content. Using pertinent accommodations and materials, participants will work to develop a plan to support both English learners and classroom teachers. This presentation will consist of two essential components in providing ELs with equitable access to content curricula: (1) hands on materials that can be used in the classroom to support ELs; and (2) support resources for both ELD and classroom teachers to guide professional development programming.

Cindy Barnes, ELD Specialist, Springfield School District, Springfield, Pennsylvania


Tools for Managing Stress and Compassion Fatigue

This workshop will offer an introduction to the practices behind individual flourishing, particularly useful for those in positions prone to compassion fatigue and burnout. Drawing from the fields of Positive Psychology and Lifestyle Medicine, attendees will learn basic tools for managing stress and compassion fatigue, promoting balanced functioning, and increasing resilience and overall well-being.

Kate Coleman, Partner, Work Wisdom, LLC, Lancaster, Pennsylvania

Concurrent Sessions

BESST – Building an E-Partnership for Student Success and Transition: Preparing ELs for College Writing

The School District of Philadelphia’s (SDP) Multilingual Office and the Community College of Philadelphia (CCP) are collaborating to align secondary Pennsylvania Core Writing Standards with CCP’s writing outcomes. Teachers and faculty are participating in synchronized, virtual Professional Learning Communities (PLCs). Goals include creating aligned assignments, scaffolding tasks, and tools for evaluating student work to decrease enrollment in remedial ESL college courses. The presentation will be a review of the project and a discussion of how school districts and colleges might collaborate to better prepare and/or welcome English learners.

Donna Sharer, Ed.D., Curriculum Development Specialist, School District of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania


Construyendo Estudiantes Resilientes: Fostering Social Emotional Learning

Migrant students and English learners who are learning a new language while in the process of integrating into a more multicultural sense of being need to build resilience and develop a growth mindset given the many challenges they may face in today’s school system. This presentation provides strategies and practices for helping migrant students and English learners develop a growth mindset in a school-wide setting.

Susan Morris-Rutledge, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Secondary Education, and Margaret Thompson, Graduate Student in School Counselor Education, California University of Pennsylvania, California, Pennsylvania


Exploring the World: A Tour through the GOSOSY Website

In this interactive workshop, migrant out-of-school youth (OSY)providers will explore the wealth of resources available in the osymigrant.org website for teaching and reaching OSY. Be ready to wear your explorer hat!

Please bring a laptop/tablet to the workshop.

Lysandra Alexander, J.D., Program Coordinator, Migrant Education Program, Pennsylvania Department of Education, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, and Deke Showman, Project Manager, Migrant Education Program, Northwest Tri-County Intermediate Unit, Edinboro, Pennsylvania


Maximizing Outcomes for English Learners: Culturally Responsive Pedagogy Meets Evidence-based Practices

This workshop will examine the shared ownership for meeting the needs of English learners within a framework of systematic and culturally responsive multi-tiered systems of support. Participants will explore effective culturally-responsive practices to strengthen general education systems to meet the needs of diverse learners.

Francine Dutrisac, Educational Consultant, Pennsylvania Training and Technical Assistance Network (PaTTAN), Harrisburg, Pennsylvania


The Power of Teams: Collaborating to Support English Learners’ Success

The collective intelligence of a collaborative team can effectively move an English learner (EL) toward language proficiency and success. This session examines the expertise of school team members and explores how their data can be applied reliably to an EL. Participants will interact as part of a team meeting using EL data to examine progress, define needs, and develop interventions before exploring how this framework can be implemented in their unique school settings.

Ann Tenan, ESL Educational Consultant, Capital Area Intermediate Unit, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania


STEM and Language Acquisition

This workshop will emphasize the notion that for English Learners (ELs), success in STEM subjects often hinges on classroom engagement and out-of-school experiences that encourage them to draw on the languages and competencies they already control in order to connect new concepts. When ELs are able to build on what they already know to develop new technical knowledge, they learn STEM content and practices while simultaneously building their proficiency in English beyond STEM. This workshop will focus on the engineering design process in particular, with hands-on activities to use in multiple settings.

David Bauman, Ed.D., Science Advisor, Pennsylvania Department of Education, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania


Techniques and Tips for Tablet MIS2000

Do you use a tablet or laptop for your work with the Migrant Education Program? This workshop will go over some Tablet MIS2000 basics, proper upload procedures, data requirements, basic reporting, and a few tips to make MIS2000 work better for you. This will include hands-on practice time.

This session is mandatory for any MEP staff that have been with the program less than one year or have been recommended for this session by a project manager. Attendees should bring a tablet/laptop to the workshop session in order to participate in hands-on exercises.

Elizabeth Weaver-Ronk, Senior Systems and Data Analyst Coordinator, Vaughn Murray, Education Programs Information Technology Manager, and Thomas Naugle, Senior Technology Consultant, Central Susquehanna Intermediate Unit, Milton, Pennsylvania


Youth Civic Engagement and Elections in Pennsylvania

This workshop will provide information on ways that young people can learn about and get involved in elections in Pennsylvania. The presentation will include information about high school voter registration drives, the Governor’s Civic Engagement Award, and opportunities to serve as a poll worker. We will also include resources for educating students and communities about recent changes to voting systems and election laws in Pennsylvania. The presenter will welcome questions from the audience during a question and answer session.

Tiffany Chang Lawson, Director, Bureau of Campaign Finance and Civic Engagement, Pennsylvania Department of State, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania